Lammily Doll Shows Us Average is Beautiful

    Back in July of 2013, the photo of “average barbie” went viral. Artist and researcher Nickolay Lamm made a 3D model of what Barbie would look like with realistic proportions of an average 19 year old girl. Lamm was then bombarded with messages from people all over the world inquiring where they could buy such a doll.

    average barbie

    For years, Barbie has been under fire for promoting an unrealistic body and beauty ideal, with body proportions that would be impossible for any human to actually obtain (while keeping all of their organs, that is). Mattel’s VP of Barbie Design, Kim Culmone, addressed these accusations last month by explaining, “Barbie’s body was never designed to be realistic. She was designed for girls to easily dress and undress.” Nevertheless, there has long been a demand for a doll that represents realistic beauty.

    Lammily Doll

    Lamm is trying to take his idea to the next level by introducing the Lammily doll. Lammily will have average human body proportions and assert that “average is beautiful.” She has articulated wrists, knees, elbows and feet, allowing her to be placed in real-life poses and make-believe tons of activities.

    Lammily Doll

    Lammily wears very neutral makeup and her wardrobe has a theme of simplicity. Lamm writes on his site, “Rather than waiting for toy companies to change their designs, let’s change them ourselves by creating a fashion doll that promotes realistic beauty standards.”

    Lammily Doll

    Lammily dolls are ready for production, which was being funded through a crowdfunding page that raised its goal within the first 24 hours of being live. You can still preorder the doll by donating, with extras thrown in for donations $50 and over. Lammily dolls are estimated to be completed in November of this year.

    Would you swap out your/your kid’s/your sibling’s Barbie for a Lammily?

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    Images: Nickolay Lamm

    21 COMMENTS

    1. I was always a Barbie lover, and I never thought Barbie and body image ever had a connection. It’s up to parents to teach their girls that they are beautiful, and not depend on television and dolls to teach them about body image.

    2. Growing up I was a Barbie addict and continue to be and it has never affected me in such ways as body image. However I would prefer the barbie over any doll.

    3. Never been a fan of Barbie even as a kid. But this is a great concept. It’s about time to change the concept of beauty.

    4. I think it’s a great idea, but I do worry about the ‘us v. them’ mentality of beauty. It’s easy to say, ‘she’s too skinny’ or ‘she’s too fat’ but it’s harder to say that everyone is beautiful. I see a lot of body shaming in both directions that I was rather ignorant to before (being a big girl, I only saw fat-shaming.) It would be nice if the Lammily dolls had a variety of body types, not just “average”.

    5. What a great concept! I want my children to grow up in a world where women don’t have to look like a Barbie doll to be considered beautiful.

    6. I love this idea. I always loved barbies as a kid, but I remember when they came out with Hawaiian Barbie… I was so disappointed. She was very dark skinned but had very asian eyes. Long jet black hair and wore a bikini. Seeing as I am Hawaiian, I was disappointed in it but figured that it was a generalization. I love that these dolls are coming out… wish I had a girl… I would totally get it.

    7. Lammily looks prettier in every way. My Mum never wanted to buy me a Barbie, saying it did not look like a child’s toy. I got gifted two Barbies and she wasn’t pleased. Thankfully I preferred My Little Ponies and those Glo Worm toys and wasn’t interested even when a pup gnawed off one Barbie’s feet.

    8. I guess I’m the odd one out because I’m not sure what’s wrong with the old Barbie. Clearly, she wasn’t made to be realistic.

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